Skip to main content

Dress #1 Butterick 4790 -- Retro '52 Walkaway Dress

For my first dress of 2014 I decided to make everyone's favourite (sarcasm) dress, Butterick 4790 The Walkaway Dress. You either love this one or you hate it. I'm mixed. Here's my final product:

Let me start by saying I'm not a huge fan of circle skirts. I thought it was OBSCENE that this dress took 7 yards of fabric and I always look like a right dillweed in a full circle skirt -- hence why I avoid them. This pattern, Butterick 4790, is also crappily designed and has some weird fit issues. I made it a size smaller than suggested just so it doesn't bag and gape. I know all of this because I had made this dress before in May 2009:

So, it's a circle skirt and has poor fit. Why the hell did I decide to make it again? Well, I like making this dress. To me, this dress is ridiculous and there is no better way to make it than with some over-the-top fabric! I had that Norman Rockwell fabric sitting in my drawer for a couple years. I had five yards of it thinking I had just enough -- LOL! I ended up having to buy 2 more yards to finish it. I would have liked to have taken a lot of the fullness out of the skirt, but my skillz are not that advanced yet so I opted to shorten the skirt instead to right above the knee.

The version I made in '09 is full length. I wore the '09 version out several times. And every time I felt like I was carrying around a bedsheet instead of wearing a dress -- the back skirt is heavy and it pulls. I ended up literally carrying it so it didn't pull. Unfortunately, I only have one photo of me wearing it in the wild from 2011. I was 20 lbs heavier and looked quite matronly in the dress:

Hoping the shortened length lets up on some of that pull!

In the end, I admit it's a fun dress to make and wear! It really does have to be made out of some outlandish material or I just don't see the point in making it at all -- since it's not really my aesthetic and the fit is bollocks.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Sailor/Nautical Chic!

1915:

1915 was a very pivotal year for fashion. It was the year restrictive Victorian styles began to give way to what would evolve into breezy 1920s styles. This is the earliest nautical styled dress I've seen in the Sears catalogs.

1916:

1921:

Nautical-style Middie blouses were popular throughout the Great War and early 1920s.

1922:

1924:

1924 is the last time nautical-styled clothing appears in the Sears catalogs for several years. Deco-styled "flapper" dresses will dominate. Perhaps they were "over" the Great War and didn't want to dwell on it...;)

1931:

Sailor girls begin to show up again in 1931. The heyday of nautical travel!

1932:

1932:

1935:

1935:

1935:

I don't think anyone understands how much I love that yellow and brown nautical number!! GAHHH!!! 1935 and 1936 was the HEIGHT of sailor-influenced fashions.

1936:

1936:

1936:

1936:

1937:

1937:

1938:

1941:

1941:

After 1941, sailor influences pretty much disappear from fashion.

40 Years of Fashion Evolution Before Your Very Eyes

Here it is -- the 40 most important years in fashion from the pages of Sears catalogs. This is what everyday people would have worn. Let's start in 1910. It was still practically Victorian times in 1910, but BIG changes were about to come and they haven't stopped to the current day. But we're going to stop in 1950 for the sake of my blog and my tastes.

Fashion from every year starting in 1910 and ending in 1950. Enjoy.


1910

1911

1912

1913

1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

1957 Fashions -- IN COLOUR!

MEGA post of fashions from the 1957 Sears catalogs! Enjoy.