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Fashion Things I Don't Like

I've sewn my fair share of things to know what works on me and what doesn't. These are those fashion details I either look really bad in, or I just don't find them aesthetically pleasing. Let's start...

1920s drop-waist dresses. Not flattering on big boobs and hips, although I do have a few patterns I want to make up. This includes the "One Hour Dress" whenever I can find fabric for it.

Extreme gathering, pleating, and draping from 1936. Nothing about this would flatter me. I just feel like there is too much going on and it will always make me think of curtains. '36 was a transitional year for fashion. The long, slim silhouette was finally changing up a bit. By '37 the a-line skirt and puff sleeve look came in.

These sleeves. Not even sure what they are called. Kimono? I think they are ugly. Not only that, they make my bust look huge and my arms look fat! I usually think any pattern with these sleeves is ugly so I don't buy them, but I do have 2 or 3 lurking in my collection somewhere.... Longer kimono sleeves, though, I can work with :)

This neckline. Boat neck? Always feels like it's never in place and usually ends up either stabbing my throat or gaping wide open. And the super-highness never looks good on my bust!

Early 60s fashion. I'm not a huge fan of 1958-1964ish fashion. I just find it uninteresting. I don't like the shorter full skirts, the boxy cuts, and the collarless bodices of this time period. To me, this is also a transitional period; the full 50s circle skirt was falling out of vogue and something new needed to break (the mini in '65!) So, I don't sew much from this era.

1970s "Pants Outfit" long tunic/pants combo. I hate this look. It looks like too much is going on (are you a mini-dress or a maternity top?) I have a pattern for this outfit, but there is also an option to make a dress -- which is why I bought it!

Comments

  1. I'm also not a big fan of 1960s fashion for myself. There are so many great patterns from the 30s to the 50s that are amazing to make that I don't even go beyond this. I haven't made a boat neck dress but I'd really love to try one. I think if you can get it drafted to your form it would be great but I bet it's a bit tricky to do.

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    Replies
    1. I like later 60s shift minis, but they are so easy to make and once you've made a few you have made them all. They aren't challenging at all. 1970-1974 is a favorite sewing era of mine. Lots of challenges and interesting lines derived from the 1930s.

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  2. *LOL* As soon as you mentioned the 1936-ish gathers and such reminding you of curtains, I immediately jumped to "Gone With the Wind"! Oddly, not the original, but the Carol Burnett skit (sorry for no link, I hate doing that on people's blog, but I'm sure it can easily be found on youtube). Oh, and even though I've professed a love of 1930's fashion, I agree with the disliking of all those gathers - I feel they make my small bust disappear - not good when blessed with a fairly substantial booty! ;)
    As always, a great post to read!

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