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Dress #16 -- Simplicity 4044 (1940s rerpro)

Wow. Today I sewed from noon until 10pm! I realized it was 7pm and I had forgotten to eat all day! Lol. I finished the skirt from Simplicity 4044, which is a 1940s reissue. I had the plaid material left over from my 30s skirt and it turned out like this:

The pattern

I made it a little snug in the hips on purpose. I usually truss myself up when I wear my creations out so I take that into consideration when checking the finished garment measurements.

The skirt was very easy to make -- just 4 skirt pieces and some waistband facing. And a zipper. I hand sewed around the scallop so this skirt took the better half of the afternoon. I never got the hang of sweetheart/scallop bits on the machine so I find doing them by hand turns out better.

I'm already about 60% done my next dress! Ha! This blog can't keep up!

Comments

  1. Great job matching the stripes/plaid! I like the idea about sewing the scallops by hand since mine usually come out wonky and I have to re-do them.

    Don't you love days like that when you're so engrossed in what you're doing the day just flies by?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, I loved it. I wasn't even hungry, but decided I should eat something anyway.

      As for the matching plaid -- complete accident! But thanks ;)

      Delete
  2. I have this pattern and have STILL not made anything from it! Arg. Yours looks great, though.

    I guess my trepidation was that, once made, that waistband would get floppy and squished while I sat down. You'll have to tell us how that waistband does.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. All the time I put into the waistband and I'm most likely going to be wearing a sweater over it -- lol. I didn't interface mine, either. I'll report back if it flops, but mine's tight enough that it shouldn't.

      Delete
  3. I have this pattern! It looks terrific on you. I'm like "osherose' above in that I just haven't had the courage to sew it up yet. my personal choice would be to interface the waist, but that's only because I'm still rather inexperienced at sewing.
    Thank you for the inspiration! :)

    ReplyDelete

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